brutalburndude asked:

I was a ballerina for 14 years and thus my feet have taken A LOT of abuse over the years. I've noticed though, that my feet are now nearly impervious to pain. How does this happen/ what occurred? I've broken my feet several times with almost no pain (only referred pain to the knee). Is this a thing?

By far the most common podiatric occurrence in ballerinas is chronic neuralgia (pain) caused by nerve damage to the feet. There’s a condition called peripheral neuropathy that can cause generalized or pain numbness in a region, but I do know quite well (from person experience) that chronic pain in a region can lead to insensitivity in general, just by the brain blocking it out.

However, if your feet still don’t hurt even when you’re consciously aware of the damage to them, the only real reason I could think of is peripheral nerve damage. This is most commonly caused by diabetes, but is also found in a significant proportion of ballerinas who start on pointe before 14 years of age (mind you, this was only one study I found, but it was well-performed and a few hundred girls).

If you’ve broken your feet several times, you probably know a podiatrist or two in your area, and I’d ask them for more specifics on your case; I’m not a doctor, nor do I know everything about what’s going on with your feet.

anxiousanalytical asked:

Can food allergies give symptoms similar to nasal and eye allergies? Allergy season is over, but my face and eyes are so puffy and red. Not to mention the near constant sneezing and nose-blowing.

For the most part, yes, they can, but they almost always have gastrointestinal reactions accompanying any general allergic response. Mayo Clinic has a useful list of possible cross-reactivity regarding food allergies relating to seasonal pollen allergies.

However, given the sneezing and puffy eyes, it’s more likely that the reaction is a developed allergic response to something environmental, such as dust, dander, or other particulate matter. A physician or nurse practitioner can probably figure out the general cause of the allergic reaction and prescribe an antihistamine, or they may refer you to an allergist. It’s always a good idea to get checked out when you have an allergic-type reaction that you don’t know the source of, as certain allergies can have serious potential developments, and many others are known to get progressively worse without treatment.

themicrobiologist
effyeahmicrobiology:

Although best known for its ability to cause severe pneumonia in people whose immune defenses are weakened, Legionella pneumophila and Legionella longbeachae are two species of a large genus of bacteria that are ubiquitous in nature, where they parasitize protozoa. Adaptation to the host environment and exploitation of host cell functions are critical for the success of these intracellular pathogens. The establishment and publication of the complete genome sequences of L. pneumophila and L. longbeachaeisolates paved the way for major breakthroughs in understanding the biology of these organisms. In this review we present the knowledge gained from the analyses and comparison of the complete genome sequences of different L. pneumophila and L. longbeachae strains. Emphasis is given on putative virulence and Legionella life cycle related functions, such as the identification of an extended array of eukaryotic like proteins, many of which have been shown to modulate host cell functions to the pathogen’s advantage. Surprisingly, many of the eukaryotic domain proteins identified in L. pneumophila as well as many substrates of the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system essential for intracellular replication are different between these two species, although they cause the same disease. Finally, evolutionary aspects regarding the eukaryotic like proteins in Legionellaare discussed
Primary source: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology

effyeahmicrobiology:

Although best known for its ability to cause severe pneumonia in people whose immune defenses are weakened, Legionella pneumophila and Legionella longbeachae are two species of a large genus of bacteria that are ubiquitous in nature, where they parasitize protozoa. Adaptation to the host environment and exploitation of host cell functions are critical for the success of these intracellular pathogens. The establishment and publication of the complete genome sequences of L. pneumophila and L. longbeachaeisolates paved the way for major breakthroughs in understanding the biology of these organisms. In this review we present the knowledge gained from the analyses and comparison of the complete genome sequences of different L. pneumophila and L. longbeachae strains. Emphasis is given on putative virulence and Legionella life cycle related functions, such as the identification of an extended array of eukaryotic like proteins, many of which have been shown to modulate host cell functions to the pathogen’s advantage. Surprisingly, many of the eukaryotic domain proteins identified in L. pneumophila as well as many substrates of the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system essential for intracellular replication are different between these two species, although they cause the same disease. Finally, evolutionary aspects regarding the eukaryotic like proteins in Legionellaare discussed

Primary source: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology

biomedicalephemera
biomedicalephemera:

Cataract resultant of Nagasaki atomic bomb
One of the effects of radiation exposure over 1 Gy is an increased incidence of cataract formation in the years following exposure. When exposure reaches 5-6 Gy, there’s a spike in cataract cases within the following two years.
Ionizing radiation does the majority of its damage to dividing cells. Because the cells of the eye divide around the periphery (outer border) and move inwards toward the center of the lens as they replace old cells, the initial damage from radiation is not concentrated in one place, and lens opacity does not immediately occur.

biomedicalephemera:

Cataract resultant of Nagasaki atomic bomb

One of the effects of radiation exposure over 1 Gy is an increased incidence of cataract formation in the years following exposure. When exposure reaches 5-6 Gy, there’s a spike in cataract cases within the following two years.

Ionizing radiation does the majority of its damage to dividing cells. Because the cells of the eye divide around the periphery (outer border) and move inwards toward the center of the lens as they replace old cells, the initial damage from radiation is not concentrated in one place, and lens opacity does not immediately occur.

Lisch nodules in neurofibromatosis-1 patient
Lisch nodules are little yellowish dome-shaped papules that project from the surface of the patient’s iris. They arise from dendritic melanocytes, and are present in nearly all patients with NF-1. Their exact cause and origin is unknown, but as they’re exclusive to patients with NF-1 (meaning not even NF-2 patients have them), they’re considered an eponymous medical sign and useful for diagnosing the condition.

Lisch nodules in neurofibromatosis-1 patient

Lisch nodules are little yellowish dome-shaped papules that project from the surface of the patient’s iris. They arise from dendritic melanocytes, and are present in nearly all patients with NF-1. Their exact cause and origin is unknown, but as they’re exclusive to patients with NF-1 (meaning not even NF-2 patients have them), they’re considered an eponymous medical sign and useful for diagnosing the condition.